Everyday

Everyday

N.J. Lypps , J.W. Kelly , R.C. Templeton , H.H. Clark , and R. L. Pringle, of "L" Flight put on a burst of speed and come from behind to win the Thunderbird Bowling League.

N.J. Lypps , J.W. Kelly , R.C. Templeton , H.H. Clark , and R. L. Pringle ( left to right ), of “L” Flight put on a burst of speed and come from behind to win the Thunderbird Bowling League.

Falcon Flight dispatcher , Wanda Gertje, consults with advanced flight instructors Satchell and Morriss before filing their cross-country flight plans with the C.A.A.

Falcon Flight dispatcher , Wanda Gertje, consults with advanced flight instructors Satchell and Morriss before filing their cross-country flight plans with the C.A.A.

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Jack Conelly , left , co-founder and president of Southwest Airways talks things over with the pilots who flew the company’s millionth hour.

Future feminine flyers at Thunderbird proved themselves adept at absorbing the intricacies of flight. In the classroom scene above, instructor Duane Maley is teaching a course in weather.

Future feminine flyers at Thunderbird proved themselves adept at absorbing the intricacies of flight. In the classroom scene above, instructor Duane Maley is teaching a course in weather.

Janet Williams of Overhaul plant and dope department helps keep production rolling by doing her bit for Victory.

Janet Williams of Overhaul plant and dope department helps keep production rolling by doing her bit for Victory.

Under the starts and stripes, Thunderbird II's maintenance crews "keep' em flying". This is Mrs. Evelyn Softly, who lists oiling props among other duties.

Under the starts and stripes, Thunderbird II’s maintenance crews “keep’ em flying”. This is Mrs. Evelyn Softly, who lists oiling props among other duties.

Members of a graduating class whip through a final game of basketball in the extensive athletic area. Cadets play an hour daily as part of their training program.

Members of a graduating class whip through a final game of basketball in the extensive athletic area. Cadets play an hour daily as part of their training program.

Time-saving, efficiency-improving devices a-plenty were invented by Southwest's maintenance departments. Glen Sweeten illustrates Thunderbird's latests at the time, for testing brake assemblies after they have been repaired but before they are mounted on landing gears. Previously, it was necessary to mount on the gear before testing the relined brake shoes or trued brake drums.

Time-saving, efficiency-improving devices a-plenty were invented by Southwest’s maintenance departments. Glen Sweeten illustrates Thunderbird’s latests at the time, for testing brake assemblies after they have been repaired but before they are mounted on landing gears. Previously, it was necessary to mount on the gear before testing the relined brake shoes or trued brake drums.

Here's a family group that won't be equalled in many aviation companies, the three Bethancourts, all of whom are flight instructors at Sky Harbor. Left to right : brother Bruce, Wife Bess and Husband Art. In between are Pug, Southwest's only flying canine , who already has some 200 hours to his credit, and Amigo, a newcomer to the Bethancourt family.

Here’s a family group that won’t be equalled in many aviation companies, the three Bethancourts, all of whom are flight instructors at Sky Harbor. Left to right : brother Bruce, Wife Bess and Husband Art. In between are Pug, Southwest’s only flying canine , who already has some 200 hours to his credit, and Amigo, a newcomer to the Bethancourt family.

A new type of insigne for army aircrafts was being placed on all planes at Southwest Airways' Fields. Lora Mae Elerick, of Overhaul paint and dope department , is shown putting the finishing touches on the new marking, which the army said, was visible at 60% greater range than either the old device on the Japanese and German markings. The white star on a field of blue was retained, but a white rectangle was added, and the entire emblem enclosed in a red border.

A new type of insigne for army aircrafts was being placed on all planes at Southwest Airways’ Fields. Lora Mae Elerick, of Overhaul paint and dope department , is shown putting the finishing touches on the new marking, which the army said, was visible at 60% greater range than either the old device on the Japanese and German markings. The white star on a field of blue was retained, but a white rectangle was added, and the entire emblem enclosed in a red border.

Picture showing Susie Q, a little Sicilian ass who was chosen field mascot for Thunderbird II in a moment of weakness.

Picture showing Susie Q, a little Sicilian ass who was chosen field mascot for Thunderbird II in a moment of weakness.

Smiling Jerry Bacon, Falcon flight commander (center), imparts confidence and flying instructions to air cadets who will finish the job he started in 1917. Here's a Falcon's World War I ace with an English and American cadet on the flight line.

Smiling Jerry Bacon, Falcon flight commander (center), imparts confidence and flying instructions to air cadets who will finish the job he started in 1917. Here’s a Falcon’s World War I ace with an English and American cadet on the flight line.

War bonds worth $25 each were awarded to employees in Engine Overhaul who had completed one year or more of service without being absent from work a single day. Felix Kallis , left , Overhaul general manager, presented the prizes to Harry Barnes , superintendent, Kenneth Walker , Bernie Pitman , Neal J. Leiter, Jesus Barraza and John Gregory.

War bonds worth $25 each were awarded to employees in Engine Overhaul who had completed one year or more of service without being absent from work a single day. Felix Kallis , left , Overhaul general manager, presented the prizes to Harry Barnes , superintendent, Kenneth Walker , Bernie Pitman , Neal J. Leiter, Jesus Barraza and John Gregory.

Field manager John Swope, receives Minute-Man flag from Walter R. Bimson , State chairman of the War Finance Committee. Fellow employees were proud of their subscription to War bonds.

Field manager John Swope, receives Minute-Man flag from Walter R. Bimson , State chairman of the War Finance Committee. Fellow employees were proud of their subscription to War bonds.

Prize-winning gadget start pal nuts turning on engine cylinder base studs won $25 for James L. Thomas (left), the night repair foreman in the Thunderbird II Maintenance department, shown with Maintenance Superintendent Guy Polston, who is inspecting the device. It was hollow tube , about 16 inches long and with a slight bend at the operating end. A turning nut on one end rotates a speedometer cable in the core which, in turn , rotates gears on the operating end and the pal nut placed on its tip. Thomas, who was the first winner in the contest for ideas to improve maintenance work at both Thunderbird fields, said the inspiration for his gadget came to him during a "brainstorm".

Prize-winning gadget start pal nuts turning on engine cylinder base studs won $25 for James L. Thomas (left), the night repair foreman in the Thunderbird II Maintenance department, shown with Maintenance Superintendent Guy Polston, who is inspecting the device. It was hollow tube , about 16 inches long and with a slight bend at the operating end. A turning nut on one end rotates a speedometer cable in the core which, in turn , rotates gears on the operating end and the pal nut placed on its tip. Thomas, who was the first winner in the contest for ideas to improve maintenance work at both Thunderbird fields, said the inspiration for his gadget came to him during a “brainstorm”.

A most ambitious person was Don Bell, 23, Falcon Flight instructor , who worked four hours a day as a mechanic in the field's advanced hangar. Bell, who had been an instructor at Falcon since July 1943, was working as a mechanic in his time off from instructing since the last 4 months ( at January 1944 ). " I puttee extra money I earn from this spare-time work into the purchase of war bonds", Bell said.

A most ambitious person was Don Bell, 23, Falcon Flight instructor , who worked four hours a day as a mechanic in the field’s advanced hangar. Bell, who had been an instructor at Falcon since July 1943, was working as a mechanic in his time off from instructing since the last 4 months ( at January 1944 ). ” I puttee extra money I earn from this spare-time work into the purchase of war bonds”, Bell said.

All dolled up in his new instructors' uniform was Fred Merha , advanced pilot at Falcon Field. Uniformed instructors were a recent innovation.

All dolled up in his new instructors’ uniform was Fred Merha , advanced pilot at Falcon Field. Uniformed instructors were a recent innovation.

Wallace Child, cross country instructor, takes a look at the course his student has plotted on the map.

Wallace Child, cross country instructor, takes a look at the course his student has plotted on the map.

A member of the wash-down maintenance crew at Thunderbird II, Ella Williams does her bit to keep planes in first-class condition at all times.

A member of the wash-down maintenance crew at Thunderbird II, Ella Williams does her bit to keep planes in first-class condition at all times.

Earl H. Gertje , Falcon Field instructor, shows the "vest-pocket" Link Trainer which he designed to facilitate cadet instruction.

Earl H. Gertje , Falcon Field instructor, shows the “vest-pocket” Link Trainer which he designed to facilitate cadet instruction.

Melvin K. Lyster, Chief Link instructor (left), and George L. Cooper, maintenance chief, at Falcon Field point to a drawing of the mechanism which they have installed on their trainers to eliminate " initial spin".

Melvin K. Lyster, Chief Link instructor (left), and George L. Cooper, maintenance chief, at Falcon Field point to a drawing of the mechanism which they have installed on their trainers to eliminate ” initial spin”.

John R. Winn, Falcon instructor, left, with former student, Lt. Francis N. Satterlee was on route to Long Beach to join the 6th Ferrying Group, of which he is member.

John R. Winn, Falcon instructor, left, with former student, Lt. Francis N. Satterlee was on route to Long Beach to join the 6th Ferrying Group, of which he is member.

The shadowgraph, designed by Thunderbird II ground school instructors, facilitates aircraft recognition by cadets. Classroom lights can actually be left on without dimming the image so students can take notes.

The shadowgraph, designed by Thunderbird II ground school instructors, facilitates aircraft recognition by cadets. Classroom lights can actually be left on without dimming the image so students can take notes.